Fries and Pies co-owner Terrance Paul talks with the province’s economic operations regional manager Marc von der Gonna during the City of Prince Rupert’s business walk on May 17, 2018. (Matthew Allen / The Northern View)

Business Walk returns to gauge business climate in Prince Rupert

Volunteers went business-to-business on May 17 to get feedback from owners and managers

Volunteers took to Prince Rupert’s streets once again to take the pulse of the city’s businesses in its annual Business Walk survey.

Twelve surveyors visited approximately 100 businesses, asking questions to get their sense of the business climate in the city. Questions included whether the business is growing, remaining steady or shrinking, what some of the challenges of operating the business are, and how the city’s leadership can help entrepreneurs thrive and grow.

READ MORE: Business Walk aims to take economic snapshot of Rupert

This is the second year the city has officially organized the walk — a similar, informal project was organized in 2016 — and as business owners become more familiar with the survey, they are welcoming the opportunity to offer feedback.

“They now know what the business walks are about so they know once a year they’ll be contacted, interviewed and it gives them a chance to have their voice,” said Paul Vendittelli, the economic development officer with the city.

Vendittelli added that the walk — which was coordinated by the City of Prince Rupert in partnership with Community Futures, the provincial government and the Prince Rupert and District Chamber of Commerce — is a great way to establish communication between the city and its business owners, who might not otherwise have an opportunity to make their voices heard.

“With a lot of these small businesses it’s one person on staff, so it’s difficult for them to get out in these support groups like the chamber or the city,” he said. “So when you go to them, you’re on their turf, you’re with them and that’s where you can ask them these questions and they’re able to have a voice.”

Most of the businesses owners surveyed had similar answers to the questions posed. Many of them said what they enjoyed most about running their business was the interaction with the people of Prince Rupert. The biggest issues identified were lack of parking downtown, and difficulty finding quality staff.

When asked how the city could support them better, most responders said raising the profile of Prince Rupert, and making it a more attractive place for people to come, work and live was the most important thing.

READ MORE: Prince Rupert mayor outlines visions, challenges in Hay 2.0 presentation

“It was a great idea. When I saw the notice come through that they were doing it, I was excited,” said Sonu Sandhu, manager at City Furniture who sat down with one of the surveyors. “The communication is there, but it’s important that they do something with it.”

After completing their walks, the volunteers met at the Community Futures offices in downtown Prince Rupert where they discussed the responses they received. Vendittelli said the city will now work with its partners to compile the data gathered and present to council and the community in the coming weeks.



matthew.allen@thenorthernview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Volunteers from the City of Prince Rupert, the Prince Rupert Chamber of Commerce, Community Futures and provincial government took to the streets on May 17 to survey the small businesses. (Matthew Allen / The Northern View)

Just Posted

Big wrestling from a small town

Aaron Roubicek wants to put Prince Rupert on the map at the BC Summer Games

WEB POLL: Are you guilty of foodwaste at home?

B.C. food retailers are trying to change people’s behaviour to reduce food waste

Bear Creek continues $14.5M civil suit with Brucejack Mine owner

The Terrace-based company is looking for damages for unpaid work as it continues Highway 16 work

Ford F350 bursts into flames on Highway 16

Driver on way to Terrace when incident occured

Suspect responsible for police standoff faces five criminal charges

The 47-year-old male had his first court appearance in Prince Rupert and remains in custody

This Week Podcast — Episode 94

Police standoff, Ridley Terminals plans to expand, a community garden and more in Prince Rupert

Newspaper carriers wanted!

Contact The Northern View today to find out how you can become a part of our team

Open water swimming from B.C. to Washington in 24 hours

The swim will take a full day, meaning Susan Simmons will be swimming in the black of night

Cigarette packs with graphic images, blunt warnings are effective: focus groups

Warnings considered effective flag ailments smoking can cause, like colorectal and stomach cancers

Canada’s title hopes quashed at Rugby Sevens World Cup in San Francisco

On the men’s side, Canada was eliminated in the round of 16 as they were shut out by Argentina 28-0

‘We are doing the right thing:’ Protesters dig in at anti-pipeline camp

B.C. Supreme Court ruled in March that both the camp and a nearby watch house could remain in place

Astronaut drops in on Kraftwerk gig, plays duet from space

Alexander Gerst becomes an astronaut musician with live performance from International Space Station

BC Wildfire update on Okanagan blazes

Watch the media briefing on the current fire situation in the Okanagan.

UPDATED: Evacuation alert issued due to Dog Creek Trail Wildfire

UPDATED: The Dog Creek wildfire has grown substantially over the past two… Continue reading

Most Read