Government failing in its educational responsibility

Every four years the democratic process allows the citizens of B.C. to go to the polls and elect representatives.

Editor:

Every four years the democratic process allows the citizens of B.C. to go to the polls and elect representatives to govern their province. And under the Constitution of Canada and the B.C. Legislature, the MLAs and the ruling government exercise that responsibility.

Part of that responsibility is to provide public education to the children of B.C. first established by the B.C. Legislature in 1872 as a move to “update” our education system and provide that B.C. had an educated citizenry to move the province forward in the years to come.

The present dispute between the teachers, government and, of course, the children and families has gone on too long. And although the government and the teachers have both said they do not want a legislated resolve to this dispute, the government has a responsibility to ensure that public education is provided for the children of B.C.

Yes it is complicated, and the ongoing court case is a major stumbling block. The government of B.C. has a duty to provide public education to the children and families of B.C.

The government’s refusal to exercise that responsibility is an abdication of their elected duty.

Gerard Janssen

Qualicum Beach