The 24/7 recycling transfer station is expected to open in late September.

Start of 24/7 recycling pushed back to late September

Soon there will be flexibility for North Coast residents who recycle, with the completion of a 24/7 recycling transfer station.

Soon there will be flexibility for North Coast residents who recycle, with the completion of a 24/7 recycling transfer station allowing them to drop off material whenever is convenient.

“We’re expecting [the 24/7 recycling transfer station] to be open in the latter part of September,” said Tim Deschamp, Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District superintendent of waste management.

While originally scheduled to open by August’s end, work is now in full-gear by contractor Eby and Son Construction.

The round-the-clock facility will be located at the Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional Recycling Depot site on Kaien Road and will include a number of large bins so residents can drop off fibre, plastic, metal and Styrofoam products whenever they please. The new transfer station will have enough space to accommodate multiple vehicles and provide protection from the elements.

For safety reasons, the facility will be well lit and under video surveillance.

The project’s price tag is $123,000, with gas tax funds covering $65,500 of the costs, Coast Sustainability Trust contributing $29,500 through a grant, the Prince Rupert Port Authority donating $18,000 through its Community Investment Fund, and the City of Prince Rupert making a $10,000 in-kind donation.

The depot is currently open during business hours Monday through Friday, along with a few hours on Saturdays. The limited hours have made it hard for many residents to return materials, with the Skeena —Queen Charlotte Regional District wanting to increase access so working professionals and families can utilize the facility at their convenience.

The idea was brought about through a collaboration with the City of Prince Rupert’s engineering department.