City Council briefs: rogue wolf addressed, emergency plan enacted

Prince Rupert city staff are making sure Prince Rupert is prepared should any emergency event happen like Fort McMurray.

Prince Rupert City Council

Rogue Prince Rupert wolf addressed

Terrace conservation officer Gareth Scrivner provided Prince Rupert mayor and council with an update on the spring wolf sightings situation.

Multiple calls, although not more than usual for this time of year, brought officers to the North Coast to deal with a problem wolf that had reportedly been seen playing in residents’ backyards and chasing dogs and people.

Scrivner noted that the wolf had most likely been cast off or rejected from its Kaien Island pack, which the officer estimates to be between 12-13 wolves, and had been roaming the town’s side of the island.

“This springtime, the wolf that was causing most of the problems has been removed via trap and we didn’t have any more calls or complaints after that,” he said.

Emergency management plan enacted

While much of Canada watched as a wildfire blazed through Fort McMurray, city staff are making sure Prince Rupert is prepared should any emergency event force a similar response.

A new Emergency Management Plan was drafted and given first, second and third readings. The plan updates various items that were out of date since the original document was created in the early 1990s.

A management committee made up of response teams from around Prince Rupert and city staff will be created and the committee will take part in a table-top exercise in the fall to go over what would occur in the event of a wide-scale emergency in Prince Rupert. Prince Rupert fire chief Dave McKenzie was appointed the city’s emergency management coordinator, the lead in organizing the response units and developing strategic plans.